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of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
ago, henry kissinger, then president nixon's national security advise secretly flew to china, beginning a string of meetings that would eventually open that isolated eastern nation to the western world. that opening checked soviet expansionism and in a sense was the beginning of the end of the cold war. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> it was also the beginning of china's entry into the world economy, which has resulted in that country becoming the world's second largest economy. >> red china's -- >> but back then, the idea of a reproachment with china would have been rejected as pure fantasy. china was a radical revolutionary communist regime that had been fighting america and its allies across the globe. how did the decision come about in the midst of such intense opposition? what were the internal maneuverings that paved the way? the secret dealings that made it actually happen? who better to ask than the man himself, dr. henry kissinger. >> this is what the world looked like when you enter into the white house with richard nixon. the united states has had n
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
. michigan has been watching all the progression and the job goes to indiana. not to china. but to indiana. so the governor says okay, bay area do you think? 51 to 47%. michigan support this move to be a right to work state. there are 30 states headed up by the republican governors. you know what they have to do? clean up the problem for the past couple of decades to figure out how could we get jobs to stay in america. if this violence had been at a tea party do you think we would have heard the end of it? no. instead, it those be all of a sudden it's your fault or my fault. i'm to blame because if someone kills his girlfriend with a gun. i'm to blame if someone punchs somebody in the face. because of the republicans? it's not my fault people in michigan don't have jobs. >> bob: if you were with the united mine workers when they sent in guys with guns and shot these guys down there trying to execute the right to collective bargaining. long history. >> dana: collective bargaining is maintained in this bill. >> andrea: why are they fighting? there must be generous packages on the table. not
are seeing a slowdown. i believe that we need to do some marketing in china. we need to see the destinations of the world. >> i was recently at a competent ter of yours. they had mark downs on warm weather clothes. >> cold weather clothing bought of the heat, the warm weather is having an issue. it is a small piece of our business. but hopefully it is going to get cold again. >> i have to tell you, i wish you the best of luck. it sounds like despite the plagues, things have been doing pretty well. this means a very good call on if you believe the stock market is going to go higher. you heard it from the man. stay with sacks, stay with cramer. >> coming up, are you ready to get charged up? cramer goes electric on a hyper active lightening round. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margi
dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu and visiting professor from beijing university and author kwof "death by china" and cnbc contributor. ann, let me go to you first. if we, the u.s. taxpayer and government are dumb enough to build a goofy battery company that goes bankrupt why shouldn't china scoop it up? >> i think this is a great story. first of all, taxpayer money wasn't wasted. all that money from the government went to help property plant and equipment here on american soil. and it's staying in america. chinese companies are not going to pack it up and move it to china. it's staying in the united states. they are going to hire u.s. employees to run it. that means more american prosperity. that's what we want. i think this is a win-win situation. the company that bought this is basically like the warren buffett of china. >> all right. let me get there. the
line of mac computers in china, apple is set to bring some of its manufacturing jobs back home to the usa. is this a political move or is this a clear-cut economic manufacturing move? here to discuss is "forbes" columnist and china export gordon chang, the author of "the coming collapse of china." serious question, do you think actual's doing this for politics or economics? >> actually both. but when you look at china, though, their manufacturing days are over. americans are less produmore pr less prone to strike -- >> are you sure american works are less prone to strike? we've reported on this show a whole bunch of strikes, including the hostess twinkie companies, the ports of los angeles and out on the west coast. we have obama in the white house. the unions are going whild here. in all seriousness, i don't think unions are any more placid here than they are in china. >> but in china, workers go out on wildcat strikes all the time. foxconn which manufactures about 97% of apple's products, they've been really subject to labor troubles, from suicides to strikes. so i think appl
on a trampoline or deep pool. we think housing, autos, anything china related can be bought right here using weakness as an opportunity to buy and not sell as we work toward a deal. keep in mind that it might take until the super bowl when everyone by then would have seen the truncated paychecks and got to get a deal then. give them the failure of the government to rise up to a compromise on the cliff so far. you would expect a bigger sell-off today unless of course you recognize that a compromise is more easily reached in 2013 than 2012 and maybe a stopgap. if we wake for a kick the can deal, what's the point of selling? it's better to be a buyer instead of seller. compromise is far more likely than not despite last night's shenanigans. jack in florida, jack? >> caller: i read your book. i enjoyed it very much. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm following a sector rotation strategy with some of my investments. currently in the material sector. and hoping to catch more of the housing uprise. but with the fiscal cliff looming, i was wondering if you would advise more defenseless strategy like consu
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
aren't you shopping? i question your patriotism. >> i bought enough stuff from china and thrown it away already. >> right now for valentine's day shopping we have to solve that long beach strike. >> clerical workers. >> you can't get things i want to start shopping for for valentine's day the moment christmas and hanukkah is over. you have to start shopping for the next day. that will be constrained because of the port strike. >>> when we come back, house majority whip kevin mccarthy did sign this offer from the gop. can he convince the white house to back the republican solution to the fiscal cliff? one more look at futures on a tuesday morning as melissa said. not a lot of data today. just wait until the next three days. it all starts with adp, jobs coming up later this week. more "squawk on the street" back in a minute. bob, these projections... they're... optimistic. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy
in china that that without any warning it shatters. this is in shanghai. it's very popular at the mall here. it's got turtles and sharks and 33 tons of glass and water all over the place. amazingly nobody was killed but 16 were hurt. tell us a little bit about why you suppose this happened. does this have anything to do with temperature or how do people explain it? >> i'll never look at an aquarium the same again. this was a ten-inch piece of plate glass that exploded literally. people said there was a crack. all of a sudden after the crash the water rushed out and it sounded like an explosion. what investigators now believe happened here is the tank had very warm water in it. the outside temperature, although this is in a mall, this was the outside-facing glass. you can see there are trees there. this was in the cold part of the mall, kind of the outside exposure. temperatures got down into the 20s. not like i had never gotten into the 20s before but this here with the warm on the one side, the water, the cold on the other side, they believe a fault in the glass, a scratch, obviously somet
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
, china on the long side. >> that does it for us. catch the documentary tonight, behind closed doors at mariott, start at okay. >>> "halftime" is over. second half of the trading day starts now. >> absolutely. spend the night in a hotel with scott walker tonight at 9:00. ats he froo free. fed leaving interest rates the same but that's not the news. there is a new bond buying program and making an historic move keeping interest rates down low so long as unemployment rates stays above 6.5%. tying the rate it an economic trigger. an date. fed chief bernanke gearing up in about an hour's time. apple moving into your living room. yes, sir. tech tightian reportedly closer to testing several tv set designs. will it be the game-changer that so many have been waiting on? and you heard it here on cnbc. j.p. morgan's jamie dimon. taking about the fiscal cliff. do they expect a deal? their take on what happens if we do go over. my partner sue at the new york stock exchange. my partner sue with big interviewes this hour. >> that's right, ty. i spent the afternoon at blackrock's trading room and i
a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking about fundamentals in the stock market more than just the cliff. we've got to talk about apple reversin
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the market. >> they just accelerated dividends. but i think we're talking now 150 companies in some fashion have accelerated or put forward a special dividend. you put forward a special market share, china is 76, with the market share at least. >> is it a disappointment that apple did not pay a special dividend? is that part of this? >> there was some of that. >> there was some expectation? not that they ever gave any voice to it. they never said a word about it. >> true. >> look, it is widely owned if the stock were -- it's obviously, here's the stock that went from 70 to 50, maybe it goes to 48, 45. everybody who doesn't know what apple is, other than the fact that they use an imac or iphone are selling it. and, look, if you're a hedge fund manager you went from thinking i have to own it, or i have to short it. . >> in
. last, but certainly not least, i think you could see the new leadership team in china come more aggressive reform program than people are expecting. >> all right. michael, good to have you. >> thank you so much. >> michael jones of riverfront. >> financials looking to continue their upward momentum from yesterday when both bank of america and citi hit new 52-week highs. independent research analyst meredith whitney has turned bullish on financials, too. whitney citing several factors including her view that banks are more than adequately capitalized. and guys, the weakest position banks from the crisis are now more than adequately capitalized, thus what they earn going forward, whatever that is, will now be theirs to employ with far greater discretion than has been the case in the past. that's the crux of her note. >> it needs to be listened to. i think we make a little bit much of meredith whitney, to be frank. it's been a controversial call on municipal bonds a couple of years ago that has not been proven correct. she might argue with that, but i think that's in the facts. you
interest rates for a long time globally as well, and i think you also have encouraging data points in china, stabilization in europe and the u.s. at 2.7% gdp growth is a little stronger to handle this, so that's why i think you want to be buying on this. >> everybody wants to buy. so many people -- you want to be bullish, but these guys in washington, and gals in washington, give you so little reason to actually be bullish. you're right. the corporate sector you know, loaded with cash, fundamentals turning positive. >> but this is the big difference from last year, last summer where the economy was so fragile. we were in such a fragile state last suggest so it was easy to tip us over. now we're a little better here in the states but a lot better in china, and a little bit better in europe. >> we've got to get to jim. >> because of the contrarian view, jim, is once we get a deal, we sell right into the deal. >> yeah, that's right. i'm going tonight skunk at the garden party here, and i'm geg going to tell you i never thought we'd get a deal. throwing rocks at each other. more likely we won't
in the province in china, obviously, mentally disturbed, he tried to kill as many children as he could. but all he had access to was a knife. the result, despite many injured, not one child died. the problems that produce the newtown mas ker. are not complex nor are the solutions. we do not lack for answers. what we lack in america today is courage. for more on this take a look at my "washington post" column. you'll find it on cnn.com/fareed. let's get started. >>> so, let's get right to it. a conversation about the real economic problems this country faces. on my right and on the right, glen hubbard, the former chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and dean of the business school. on my left, peter orszag, obama former budget director and sort of in the middle, zanny minton beddoes and chrystia freeland, be editor of routers digital. i promised we were going to get past the cliff. but i have to ask a few questions about it. just this. you don't think it's that big of a deal if we go over the cliff. >> i don't think it's that big of a deal if we get to january 3rd or january 4th and we don
saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look, i think this is what's going to happen. i think it's 50-50 we get a deal. no vacation. no legislation, no vacation. i think that when people get their paycheck at the end of january, they are going to be sho
about china electric demand being strong. remember, they make coal machinery, depending upon how much electric demand there is in china, his orders go up. that's why i think people are surprised the stock eel not down big, given his concerns throughout the near term. >> comments, the buybacks continue. >> now, i begin to say, wait a second. one buyback, maybe -- too much coincidence here. you have the news out of joint global. i think people are starting to say this fourth quarter's an inflection point for china. less worried about inflation, more worried about pro-growth. cummins is a uniquely chinese story. so many truck engines go there. let's keep track of this. >> a lot of people say if you've got gdp growing again and inflation as low as it is, that is the sweet spot, that is where you always want to be. >> india came out with global stuff. coal, i know, we're only used to seeing coal phased out in this country. they love coal in china. i don't want to make a judgment on whether that's -- but they are huge coal plant builders there. huge. >> an important one to watch. we'll talk
's claim that -- mitt's claim that jeep was moving its production to china causing a flood of negative press directed at mitt. of course it did. only the american media could see this little flubb as worse than the bungled aftermath following the death of four americans in benghazi. forget the other liberal lies that paul ryan pushes grannies off the cliff, remember that? or mitt murdered a guy's wife. that was fun. media is a sad middle age man at strip club overcome by obama lust diminished by stupidity. the emperor has no close clothes. all they can do is keep whistling. why every news outlet ran with the fake award. the blog claims the public expressed collective outrage and they must mean male bloggers with ponytails. saying this is the real lie but it's worse than a lie. abetting the obama coverup, the media is an accessory after the fact. we still don't know where this video idea came from, i will never stop. don't you think that is worse than a crack about jeeps shipped to china? the politifact lie of year award should go to politifact. congrats. covering up "o"'s mistake is yo
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
to stay a whole day and have programs that will allow them to be competitive with children in china and india, if you need that to be a real situation in america for us to be competitive ten years from now when we're not in a recession, you have to look at that and say this is not smart policy for the long term. and whatever we have to do to protect and insulate those children, we do that. now, how do we do that, you know, they were talking about before with food stamps, that's the hammock versus safety net discussion. we don't want it to be a hammock for people where people just lounge around and expect to get food stamps forever but you need a safety net when the bottom falls out and the bottom has fallen out. at this point, it is very cool to be able to look -- not cool, kind of cruel, even, to be able to look at what people can buy, what they can get and whether or not that is sufficient. >> i think cory booker's doing a great thing. just having it on the desk here was fascinating, what you actually buy and realize you try to buy it in new york, for example, could cost you up to
? not that long ago we heard very smart short sellers write off both china and europe it was on a year ago that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. fi
. if apple gets approval for the china mobile contract, and the television, the smart television which are both expected, anticipated this year, we're looking for earnings this coming year of $50. $50 times 14 is $700 price target. we have a $720 price target, bill. so we've put apple, qualcomm, microsoft, oracle, and your big club stocks. all of those have done well this year. the big winners of this month, the banks have come on super strong. china ma and japan. and i think you can start to nibble a little on china and japan, as well. >> michael, is there an argument to be made that you don't want to touch stocks right now until you have some clarity on this fiscal cliff? just in case we see a big sell-off? >> there is, but i'll argue, too, that you're talking about $600 billion being sucked out of the economy next year. the s&p made $20 trillion. while we are looking at the fiscal cliff countdown, there is another countdown to new all-year highs when the dow is close to the prior peak around 600% from here. investors should be looking overseas. you want to look where there is no fis
in china. may make beautiful products. they are a private company, family owned mostly that's made a company wide decision that their priority is on keeping jobs in the ohio river valley and placed it above profit. it would be more profitable for them likely to move their manufacturing to china or elsewhere. that's not going to be realistic. most companies won't make that the priority. are consumers ready now to pay a premium to buy made in america goods? >> look. i commend them for doing that. i have to tell you, wages in china are rising. i spoke to somebody recently building a hotel and looking at the numbers, prices really aren't much different with thing that is are being imported now and made here in the united states. prices are going up tremendously. now that a lot of attention is brought to, you know, the terrible conditions and working environments and the terrible wages in china. and look. we have to start just reinvesting ourselves and you could buy things made in china that last you not that long that are not safe. there's nothing better than american quality, the safe
about companies that have marginal exposure to united states but are much more involved with china? you could see joy global keep its gains. that company's mining equipment is more dependent on a resurgent china than a possible slowing of the united states. we're cutting back on coal anyway. what's the most worrisome thing on the whole decline? that this is really day one in recognition that the ceos were had here, the foils to james dean's rebel without a cause triumph, and they are recognizing that there is a cause. soak the rich with higher tax rates and cut nothing. cut nothing back, because the mandate, well, that was what the president thought he was elected on. to appropriate a little shakespeare, what fools these ceos be. the president, here is the way i summarize what they are thinking. president's rising above all right. rising above the cliff. they're going to fall off in the vicious game of chicken. bottom line, we have to hope history isn't repeating itself, that the market is beginning go down the path of the preceiling debacle, before we get crushed and get the deal. but
economically, china being the biggest case of this, turning out millions of engineers, scientists, jumping up in productive and technology and they made some interesting calculations of course, the numbers are, you know, a little bit subject to question, but they're trying to add up the factors that create global power, whether it's the size of the economy, or the amount of research and development countries are doing, or the level of education of the population or the military. so basically we see that the u.s. that was so dominant 40 years ago, we know that our dominance has been going down relative to other countries is basically going to become one of a few superpowers, but not only the superpower. >> so other countries are catching up. how does that have to do with what we all talk about as the decline we see happening here and how real is it? >> i think what this report rightly stresses is that there are a number of things going on. one is that others are catching up. and the other is that we have got many problems that we're not attending to. >> what is for real? >> one thing that's fo
about the fiscal cliff in china? why is beijing so concerned? >>> and it's the most livable city on earth. we'll show you why in today's list of number ones coming right up. >>> but now let's go to number two on our first five web stories. rumors are swirling in washington that former president bill clinton could wind up as the next u.s. ambassador to ireland when the globe-trotting clinton made his third trip to the emerald isle in november he joked he could run for president of ireland if only he had a home there. eat good fats. avoid bad. don't go over 2000... 1200 calories a day. carbs are bad. carbs are good. the story keeps changing. so i'm not listening... to anyone but myself. i know better nutrition when i see it: great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more processed flakes look nothing like natural grains. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. for multi grain flakes that are an excellent source of fiber try great grains banana nut crunch and cranberry almond crunch. a re
from now, the united states is going to have to step aside and let china take the top spot. christine romans is here with me to explain what this is all about. >> so this is a report that the 17 different intelligence communities in the united states put together every four years for the incoming administration. the lay of the land for what you're facing leading the world superpower, the united states. and this report finds that 350 years of an ascendant west will be reversed and you will see asia as the dominant superpower once again, going back to its position that it held in the middle ages. here's what it found. you'll have asia leading by 2030 in size, in terms of gdp, military spending, population size, technology investment. the largest economy will be china. it will have overtaken the united states, even before 2030. you will see global economic crisis. you will see the majority of the world's population out of poverty for the first time in world history. >> and a huge middle class, all of a sudden, right? >> middle classes around the world, and they will be the driving politi
that was doing fabulously in china and making up for all sorts of north american weakness. that had been the theme for a couple of years. now it's just the opposite. people are concerned about the inventory building in china putting a lid on the stock. now, i am looking for a lid to be blown off by a turn in china eventual l. maybe not this quarter. while the u.s., i think, is strong because of foot locker, but some analyst came out today and said u.s. is even weak. remember, nike trades on futures orders, not on earnings. so if you're dumb enough to want to trade in after hours, be aware, you might be trading on the wrong number. friday. these are big brand names. what a big week next week. friday we get results from walgreen's. i feel badly for wag. we just heard from cvs yesterday which boosted its numbers. that's a tough comparison to go against. i don't know how walgreen's can keep up. i will say this, though, the drug stores have been in secular share take mode from other stores, which is one reason why cvs was able to deliver such a strong number p. and i think walgreen's will sho
on sale today, in the world's biggest smartphone market, china. that country is hugely important to apple, which has seen its stock price slide lately. only the u.s., in fact, buys more apple products. and china accounted for almost $24 billion or about 15% of apple's revenues in the past year. >>> and it's no secret that apple and other tech companies pay well. it turns out even their interns are scoring big bucks at facebook. >> business insider reports facebook pays interns more than $5,600 a month. and that ends up being about $67,000 a year, yep, for being an intern. that's about $25,000 more than the average u.s. worker makes. >> here's your application. and i printed one out for me. >>> when we come back, the guests who got a lot more than they expected at one golden corral. >>> and some sad faces this morning in philadelphia, after yet another disappointing performance by those eagles. introducing nook hd - the world's best 7" tablet made for reading and entertainment. your favorite magazines and catalogs look better than ever. and with scrapbooking, you can save the things you lo
than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>> also, the national association for business economics growth in 2013 to come in at 2.1% after growing by 2.2% in 2012. that would continue the same tepid growth that the country has seen since the recession ended back in mid 2009. >>> and the nation is mourning the horrific event of friday in newtown, connecticut. president obama spoke last night about change. >> we can't kol rate this any more. these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex, and that is true. no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or event every senseless act of violence in our society. >>> and earlier in the day, new york city mayor michael bloomberg called on th
guidance was below expectations due to soft sales in china. >>> speaking of china, apple will soon be able to sell his newest version of the iphone there. >>> as for the economy, consumer spending fell slightly last month due to disruptions from >>> welcome back to "hardball." republicans have spent the past three weeks at least doing an elaborate and very public autopsy on the 2012 election. asking what went wrong. good question. like democrats before them after losing an election, they're focusing on the usual suspects, we didn't have the right candidate, didn't get our message out, didn't get our voters out. when you lose the popular vote of five or six elections, you have to consider the voters just didn't reject your messenger, they rejected perhaps your message. we have two strategists back with us. one democrat steve mcmahon and republican rick tyler. rick, you first because you guys lost, and i don't mind saying this because i'm heartened by this. i didn't know it was going to happen. i thought the first debate, as i said clearly on the air -- the president said i was having a stro
fannie and freddie or not? we can hardly tell china to go jump in the south china sea because they were our biggest creditors. so by 2008 the game was over. treasury had to come in and provide huge infusions of money. so far this has cost about $142 billion. fannie and freddie now were under the thumb of the regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow, and he promised to shrink them gradually and to reduce the independence of the housing market on them gradually. but meanwhile, we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most home mortgages. fannie and freddie and fha in recent years have accounted for around 90% of new u.s. homeland. eventually congress will have to make have to make fundamental decisions about what kind of mortgage market will we have. should we go back to trusting the free market, or shall we have some kind of government mechanism in place to ensure that to mortgages can always be a portable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggest that when it comes to housing, congress will have a hard time trusting the market. tha
ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doing very well. china stocks having a bit of a comeback year. in other words, as a global guide, there are options to playing this fiscal cliff game here in new york. >> absolutely. you don't have to just trade the s&p 500. i mean, look at tonight, you're seeing australia up a third of a point. the japanese yen is doing very well. look at hong kong. if you want to take what the federal reserve did and apply it internationally, look at hong kong. their monetary policy is pegged to what the federal reserve does. but they have an inflation issue and their economy is tied to china. so if you buy something like ewh, the hong kong etf, all those stocks are priced in hong kong dollars. if the hong kong dollar is repegged, the ewh will go up as much as the repegging. >> what does that mean for the u.s. market? where are you on the u.s. market right now? >> you know, i think right now, probably to the end of year, if we can get some kind of movement on this fiscal cliff, you have a real potential for a pop, 3%, 4%, 5%. unfortunately,
into this year. yeah, you know what i'm talking about, china. how about that economy over there? after pausing because the government was busy whipping inflation, now, thank you, late gerald ford, now it's coming on strong. i think growth in china's accelera accelerating. the stock market might be the most undervalued in the world. the stock market entirely could be under valued. how many short sellers told you to do the opposite and sell that market? after the steam roller it's been of late, what exactly are the short sellers saying now? i don't know, i'm not hearing them clearly. i'm not listening. i'm not, no, i'm not hearing. europe and china both were supposed to slip into oblivion in 2012. that was the easiest story, everybody wrote it. turned out two fabulous places to invest. how about this housing market? most common worry, the dreaded shadow inventory. oh, the shadow inventory. >> the house of pain. >> so many banks and so many homes said the books could never recover. wasn't that the narrative? now, where are we? the shadow inventory turned out. the banks that were thought to be a t
? because hardly tell china to jump into the south china sea because they were our biggest creditors. by mid 2008 the game was over. the treasury had to coming and provide huge infusions of money. so far this cost $142 billion. fannie and freddie were under the thumb of their regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow who promise to shrink gradually and reduce the independence of the housing market gradually. meanwhile we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most mortgages. annie, freddie and the f h a have accounted for 90% of u.s. home loans. eventually congress will make a fundamental decision about what kind of mortgage market we will have. it will go back to trusting the free market or have some kind of government mechanism in place to insure that home mortgages can always be affordable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggests when a comes to housing congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussions of whom the first will be tom who has been in the mortga
with a bunch of allies who supported him. >> i've been reading kissinger's book on china, but he raises's broader question which is important. unfathomable as it is to americans there are parts of the world where they do not believe in alienable rights, right? they don't believe in human rights in the way that we do. >> exactly. and when we try to impose it on them they consider it a violation of their sovereignty. >> exactly. >> china feels that way often. russia, same thing. how far do we go in promoting human rights? the trade off that we'll get here. the law gets passed and human rights violators in russia can't come year and now 1,000 children don't come to the united states and people who want them don't get them. >> my personal view, no. they're glad to take our money and they've long had to put their money overseas, but they do not want human rights promotion and we've seen that inside russia and we've seen that against the crockdown on the internet and this is just the latest interaction of the series of things going back for more than a year against the political opposition an
's enlightening and energizing. i have noticed that retail sales are up in china almost 15% and i would love to hear your thoughts about retail stocks and your exposure in china such as tiffany. >> i'm not a fan of tiffany. that stock has been a very, very difficult stock. i do think that you want to look at pch because of the warm weather in america, but on calvin klein, that's the one i think you ought to look at. got to come in, warm weather is going to cause everybody to have jitters. i wish we could forget about politics. until we get a deal, it's bad news for themarket. even for cheap stock like apple. "mad money" will be right back. >>> tonight, two companies with break through products that are leading the charge. cramer is talking to the ceos of immunojet and seattle genetics, just ahead. and later, reenergized in pipelines, they're america's energy toll road and they can provide investors with a secure source of dividends, but his investment in north dakota's oil rich back and shale continues, cramer's looking for companies that are looking to expand. all coming up on "mad money."
. china coming back. gm rationalizing europe. >> gm europe, when you say a couple quarters behind ford, are you saying progress in the quarterly financials? >> committed to rationalizing europe. >> again, a larger theme of excess capitalization at u.s. corporations, and the fact that so much money is sitting on balance sheets doing nothing. >> did you read oracle? how much money do they have. they bought back 10 billion worth of stock. these companies, you read through their stories, and you say, not only did they not extend themselves during this downturn, they conserved a lot of cash. by the way, humans did, too, in america. have you seen the numbers that the federal reserve put out last night about how much money is being -- how little debt is being taken down by citizens. we're back to levels of the '90s. federal household debt service came out last night. the percentage of disposable income is 14%, down to 10%. that's 1994 levels. >> that's a big part of morgan stanley's call on citi today. from overweight to equal weight. consumer deleveraging in their view coming to an end. and
? >> by the way, on that china point, wind energy relies on precious metals, rare either metals and china is the chief production of that. some analysts say we'll be more reliant as we go more and more wind power, more reliant on the chinese mining industry to get rare earth metals that we need, rare earth metals. sandra: what are we doing here? the taxpayers have got to question this. this is their hard-earned dollars at work. the vetting process by the obama administration has not been all that great when investing in these companies. >> no. we've seen 80% of companies had ties with democratic donors with obama, connections, cronyism. wind produces 2.3% of the electricity. 1.3% of the global electricity. this is something that is, this was the, energy of the future back in the 1970s, 35 years ago. and it hasn't produced. every year they extend, not every year but extend the production tax credits for the wind power and the bottom line is, the wind power, always say prosperity is just around the corner. self-reliance is just around the corner. it doesn't happen. whoo we're seeing more an
transportation. i'm concerned about education. i'm concerned about cutting in all of these areas that make china -- give china a bigger advantage as we move forward that give our global competitors a bigger advantage. that's what really concerns me. >> two quick observations. if you're in business and you're told we've got to make changes at our budget and you look at 6%, 15% of your budget, 9% of your budget, you've got to make cuts, you look at the 60% first and say where can we make manufacture she's cuts. talk about not endangering our ability to compete and win going forward, you don't want to cut those areas as steve has talked about eloquently many times, there are advantages which means you have to look at entitlements. and i think to michael's point, i think there's credit to that. two, i like the fact that boehner now is in a stronger position with his caucus because if indeed they find a deal, that means he can win a majority of his people over. i like the fact that nancy pelosi's in a strong position with her caucus. so the pieces are not only coming together substantively, they're c
pickpocket. >>> number four, big trouble in communist china. everybody thought one of the most powerful politicians in china party chief boojili was getting rid of crime and corruption till this summer when a court convicted his wife of murdering a british business man and the government accused him of trying to hinder the investigation as well as taking bribes and abusing his power. now he's been kicked out of the communist party. leaders voted to expel him in november number three, a service becomes not so secret. the role of protecting the president when he trabs abroad has moments of glamour and excitement. that included hookers for some is secret service agents and military personnel visiting cartagena in advance of the president's arrival last april. it won't have bothered colombian authorities since prostitution sgs legal there. local police only got involved because of a hotel altercation between a woman and a secret service agent over the payment. number two, it's been called the building that never sleeps but the bbc's london headquarters says it was completely unaware of the
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